Snapchat will now allow users to create their own location-based Geofilters

3 Dec 20142 Shares

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Photo-messaging app Snapchat has launched a new Geofilters feature that allows users to submit artwork that will appear as a geo-targeted filter on their images.

The company had initially unveiled Geofilters in July, allowing users to swipe right to attach a special, location-based overlay image to their photographs. Now all snappers are being encouraged to upload their own images to the system that reflect unique geographical areas.

“Our team has had a tonne of fun drawing Geofilters and using them to decorate some of our favourite places around the world,” the company wrote in a blog post.

“From coffee shops in Venice to coastal towns in Oslo, we hope you’ve enjoyed discovering each little piece of art! Recently, we’ve had more and more Snapchatters ask us to help them create their own Geofilters – for marriage proposals, favourite cities, and even birthday parties!”

“Today we’re thrilled to announce our Community Geofilter website. Now it’s easy to draw a little piece of art and put it somewhere meaningful to you and your friends. We can’t wait to decorate the world with our Community Geofilters – just in time for the holidays!”

All submitted Geofilters must be original designs. Once approved by the Snapchat team, they will be available to all users of the app.

Last month, Snapchat teamed up with Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey’s Square to roll out the new mobile money platform Snapcash that allows users to send each other cash. The new tool, currently only available in the US, allows people to send and receive money through the Square Cash app.

Snapchat image via Shutterstock

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Dean is a freelance journalist and editor covering media.

editorial@siliconrepublic.com