Vanilla Ice joins Netflix in defending Ridiculous Six film

27 Apr 20151 Share

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Despite Native American actors walking off the set of Adam Sandler’s latest film, Ridiculous Six, over claims of racism, actor Vanilla Ice has backed up Netflix’s defence of the film as a piece of “ridiculous” fiction.

The film is part of a four-film deal between Adam Sandler and Netflix and already appears to have gotten off on the wrong foot after it was reported last week that almost a dozen Native American actors that were taking part in the film, which spoofs American Westerns, had walked off the set due to what they saw as offensive portrayals of their people.

Since then, Netflix has come out with a statement defending its participation in the project, citing the film’s name as a sign of what should be expected.

“The movie has ridiculous in the title for a reason: because it is ridiculous,” Netflix said through a spokesperson. “It is a broad satire of Western movies and the stereotypes they popularised, featuring a diverse cast that is not only part of — but in on — the joke.”

However, just a day later, tweets began to surface that were arguably not putting Netflix in a good light, with users showing Twitter accounts that appeared to show links or support for the racist organisation the Ku Klux Klan were defending Sandler’s film while including Netflix in their tweets.

 

Now, according to Variety, singer and actor Vanilla Ice – who is to star in Ridiculous Six – has joined the commentary by saying: “It’s a comedy. I don’t think anybody really had any ill feeling or any intent or anything. This movie isn’t Dances With Wolves. It’s a comedy. They’re not there to showcase anything about anybody — they’re just making a funny movie, I think.”

He then added to his statement: “I don’t have anything to do with it. I just play my part.”

A video has also surfaced of the Native American actors discussing their concerns with the film’s producers, who tell them: “If you are overly sensitive about it, you should probably leave.”

Netflix has given no indication that it is to change its plans to launch the film on its platform some time later this year, but in the meantime, a number of hashtags continue to trend on Twitter criticising the film’s evental release including #WalkOffNetflix and #NotYourHollywoodIndian.

Western scene image via Shutterstock

Colm Gorey is a journalist with Siliconrepublic.com

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