Dublin tech firm Decisions 4 Heroes moves HQ to an 1814 lighthouse

1 Nov 20123 Shares

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The Baily Lighthouse

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Distinctive already for its award-winning software that boosts collaboration among emergency services, Dublin start-up Decisions 4 Heroes has moved its HQ from a boring old office park to a lighthouse overlooking Dublin Bay and the Irish Sea. Talk about standing out from the crowd.

The move fits with the theme of D4H, which is to collaborate with emergency and security services during a crisis.

The company’s software Decisions is a collaborative emergency response team management tool that helps record and analyse operations, members, equipment, and training.

The software replaces the widely-used paper and spreadsheet formats and automates the entry of information using internet-connected computers, laptops, and consumer smartphone devices.

“As a company founder, there are defining decisions which you’re never quite sure if they’re genius or madness … my gut feeling is, this one is genius,” D4H’s Robin Blandford blogged this morning.

“The [D4H] HQ is now occupying the former Light-Keepers Training College, the Baily Lighthouse – positioned way up on rocks with a 134-foot high tower and light beaming out into Dublin Bay – the view from every desk is just incredible.”

The Baily lighthouse was converted into an automatic operation in 1997 and was the last lighthouse in Ireland to have a lighthouse keeper in situ.

“From the nautical artwork of shipwrecks on the walls, to the portraits of coastal watch keepers and the navigation and signalling equipment gathered over 200 years, there is a deep history of accident prevention and emergency response in our building,” Blandford said.

If that doesn’t inspire D4H I don’t know what will. Perhaps the move will inspire other start-ups to locate in novel locations. Perhaps a castle, a country house or one of the many abandoned Garda stations that litter our small towns. An abandoned Celtic Tiger housing estate would make a fantastic start-up colony in the West of Ireland if it had broadband …

 If I recall, Salesforce.com established its operations in Ireland around 2001 from a loft above Powerscourt House.

I can only congratulate D4H on the inspired move. Correct decision! By heroes, of course.

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Editor John Kennedy is an award-winning technology journalist.

editorial@siliconrepublic.com