EMC points to importance of STEM courses as CAO deadline approaches

11 Jan 20131 Share

At its stand at the BT Young Scientist and Technology Exhibition in the RDS in Dublin this week, EMC is highlighting growth areas in the IT sector: cloud, big data and security. And, with the deadline for CAO applications approaching, the US high-tech multinational is trying to stress to young students the benefits of applying for courses in these areas.

CAO applications close on 20 January this year and EMC, which employs more than 3,000 people in Ireland alone, is trying to impress upon students how jobs-rich the IT sector has become and will continue to be.

“As students weigh their CAO applications over the next few weeks, we would strongly urge them to consider courses in science, technology, engineering and maths because, over the coming decade, the global technology sector will expand and we need skilled Irish graduates to take up new high-quality jobs,” said Bob Savage, vice-president and managing director of EMC’s Centre of Excellence in Cork.

“Increasingly, the global IT sector will need new recruits, such as cloud architects and data scientists, who can create cost-effective and efficient virtual platforms that replace traditional IT infrastructure and, at the same time, make sense of the huge volume of information generated by citizens, businesses and public-sector organisations,” he added.

EMC believes Ireland can become a leader in IT services if steps are taken now to build the advanced skills that will be required of tomorrow’s graduates. And job offers won’t be limited to the tech sector, either.

“Opting for IT-related college courses will improve graduates’ chances of getting jobs – both in the IT industry and in other growth sectors, such as financial services, clean technology and life science, which demand specific IT capabilities,” explained Jason Ward, EMC’s country manager in Ireland.

Elaine Burke
By Elaine Burke

Elaine Burke is managing editor of Siliconrepublic.com. She joined in 2011 as a journalist covering gadgets, new media and tech jobs news. She comes from a background in publishing and is known for being particularly persnickety when it comes to spelling and grammar – earning her the nickname, Critical Red Pen. When she hasn’t got her nose stuck in her laptop, you’ll find her in the kitchen, at the cinema, or on the dancefloor.

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