Women in Ireland and UK less likely to receive a bonus than men
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Women in Ireland and UK less likely to receive a bonus than men

9 Nov 2018165 Views

A Globoforce report on the impact of social movements on the workplace has found that while workers are more aware of inequality, pay inequity still exists.

While the traditional end-of-year bonus is becoming less popular with time, a portion of the population can still expect a healthy chunk of change around the holiday season. Yet if you’re a women, you are less likely to receive a bonus than your male peers, according to a new study released by Globoforce.

The report, entitled Social Impact in the Human Workplace, surveyed more than 3,600 people in the US, the UK, Canada and Ireland. It examined how economic changes and emerging social movements have changed the power dynamics within workplaces.

Increasing awareness of gender equality has led to employees asking more from their employers, particular in regards to pay equity. Men are more likely to agree (70pc) that they are paid fairly for the work they do compared to women (61pc). Men are more likely to receive a higher bonus while women are more likely to receive no bonus at all.

“The forces shaping our societal landscape – calls for fairness, equity, transparency and trust – are driving an awakening in the workplace,” said Derek Irvine, Globoforce senior vice-president of client strategy and consulting. “It is simply unacceptable to treat men and women differently at work. This year’s employee survey tells the story of a workforce ready to make an impact but unwilling to stick around if inequity and bureaucratic processes get in the way.

“Organisations that provide a positive culture for their people will see renewed commitment, engagement and strengthened relationships that fuel the backbone of their business and their bottom line.”

A disparity was also observed in how comfortable employees feel sharing dissenting views at work. While the majority of employees do feel they can air unpopular views at work, women are less likely (60pc) to speak up than their male counterparts (70pc).

The report in full can be viewed here.

Eva Short
By Eva Short

Eva Short is a Careers reporter at Silicon Republic who, coincidentally, was raised in Silicon Valley and has been nicknamed a ‘digital native’. Her passions include Pomeranians, witchcraft, skincare, wearing exclusively dark colours and eating. When she’s not writing about tech professionals, she’s working backstage at festivals, yelling at musicians, and amassing a collection of crumpled gig tickets to stick on her wall.

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