AOL DevFest gets devs to grips with world of ones and zeroes
DevFest 2016 in Dublin. Image via Luke Maxwell

AOL DevFest gets devs to grips with world of ones and zeroes

18 Aug 2016152 Shares

AOL’s DevFest 2016 was held in Dublin from this week (16-18 August) as the company’s engineers came together to chat to colleagues about developing new ways of navigating a world of ones and zeroes.

The AOL DevFest is an annual event that brings together its global team of 1,200 staff across its engineering and product teams from across its 15 international offices.

With its employees spread across such far-flung locations as San Francisco, Hyderabad and Dublin, the point of DevFest is to bring them together to hear what they’re all working on.

Held this year in The Royal College of Physicians of Ireland in the heart of Dublin, the focus was on the voices of its engineers, rather than hearing from a number of managers within AOL.

Speaking with Siliconrepublic.com, the SVP of AOL Platforms Engineering, Aengus McClean, said that based on feedback from last year there was previously too much focus on managers, rather than the developers themselves.

Aside from the developers coming together to discuss the issues that matter to them, a number of speakers from AOL also were in Dublin.

Among those was AOL Platform’s chief product officer, Ernie Cormier, and the company’s digital prophet, David Shing, otherwise known as ‘Shingy’.

In explaining the importance of events like DevFest, Shing said: “Every single thing we touch… is made from ones and zeroes, so we need to understand what code does.”

Looking for jobs in tech or science? Check out our Employer Profiles for information on companies hiring right now.

Colm Gorey
By Colm Gorey

As an award-winning editor for Consumer Magazine of the Year 2013, Colm joined Siliconrepublic.com in January 2014 as a journalist covering AI, IoT, science and anything that will get us to Mars quicker. When not trying to get his hands on the latest gaming release, he can be found lost in a sea of Wikipedia articles on obscure historic battles and countries that don't exist anymore or watching classic Simpsons episodes far too many times to count.

Loading now, one moment please! Loading