Microsoft in €1m productivity push


17 Oct 2005

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on RedditEmail this to someone

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on RedditEmail this to someone

Microsoft’s Irish division has launched a €1m nine-month awareness campaign aimed at highlighting to businesses the benefits of increased productivity through the use of technology.

The multifaceted campaign, themed Microsoft — the IT in Productivity, will be aimed at raising the importance of productivity for indigenous Irish businesses through the use of IT and software.

Maurice Martin, business and marketing officer at Microsoft Ireland, commented: “The issue of increasing productivity is now undeniably in the face of Irish industry. In this campaign we are trying to first highlight the fact that productivity is the key to competitiveness and long-term success and something that Irish managers need to take a long serious look at. The solution to improved productivity is to either reduce costs or increase output and IT helps to achieve both of these.”

The campaign began in late September with a high-profile outdoor poster campaign followed by heavyweight newspaper, radio and magazine advertising over a four-week period.

The software company will also host a series of events focusing on demonstrating to Irish businesses how IT and the latest versions of Microsoft server and desktop software can deliver significant productivity gains. The overall programme will run for nine months until the end of May next year.

In addition to traditional advertising and marketing methods, a special micro website — located at www.productivity.ie — has been established. The site provides examples of Irish and international companies, including Irish Permanent, BP and A&L Goodbody Stockbrokers — that have used technology to increase productivity. It also features analyst and third-party studies of how IT can help companies improve their competitiveness.

By John Kennedy