Microsoft Band leaving US for first time, on sale in UK next month

18 Mar 20151 Share

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Microsoft Band cconstruction

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Microsoft is finally bringing its Health and Band offerings to Europe, with the UK selling the products by mid-April.

Previously only available in the US, Microsoft’s fitness focused products have garnered a pretty good reputation among the growing number of wearable devices on the market.

And now, with the Apple Watch being rolled out globally over the next few weeks, it seems Microsoft is finally ready to spread its wings in response, to an extent.

Microsoft’s GM of new devices, Matt Barlow clearly feels the numbers make sense, citing the fact that 70pc of adults in the UK are using mobile to access the internet.

“Recent studies have shown an increase in adoption of both free and paid health and fitness apps and devices, and we’ve seen research that suggests an estimated 7 million people are already using fitness-focused wearable devices in the UK, with that number expected to nearly double by the end of 2015,” he said.

Indeed even within the US, numbers are understandably key, with several new avenues to purchase the products now available. Presumably, having tested the water with the products already – only selling from Microsoft stores, only selling in the US – the company is gaining confidence in its popularity.

Microsoft Band cycle

Microsoft has included a cycle mode in its Band and Health service

Growing more and more focused on the fitness market, as opposed to merely tracking daily activities, the Band has changed since its release, now including a cycle mode to add to its standard running and walking modes.

And if it’s down to the numbers, presumably a larger roll out will soon follow, although Microsoft haven’t announced such.

Gordon Hunt is senior communications and context executive at NDRC. He previously worked as a journalist with Silicon Republic.

editorial@siliconrepublic.com