On message: Dropbox now integrates with Facebook Messenger

12 Apr 201619 Shares

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The full power of the cloud is now at your disposal within Messenger thanks to a new integration between Facebook and Dropbox

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A new integration between Dropbox and Facebook means that users can now bring the full power of the cloud to their Messenger inbox.

The new integration makes it easier to share photos and other files within Messenger.

If you have the Dropbox app installed on your phone you can now share any file from within Dropbox without leaving the Messenger app.

By tapping the More button in Android or iOS, Dropbox will appear as an available source.

Videos and images—including animated GIFs—will be displayed directly in your chats. For everything else, tapping Open will bring recipients to the Dropbox mobile app, where they can preview and save files.

Facebook wants to make Messenger your digital nervous system

Dropbox_Messenger

On the face of it, this appears to be a quick and simple way of sharing timeless photos or documents with friends or family members but, in reality, it ushers in a future where Messenger could also be a work tool that removes the clutter of email.

If anything, Facebook has been working steadily to make Messenger potentially the digital nervous system of our lives, announcing integrations in recent months with Uber for taxi hires, Spotify to share songs and playlists and KLM for boarding cards for flights.

“We want people to communicate just the way they want to on Messenger, with everyone they care about,” said Stan Chudnovsky, head of product for Messenger.

“Giving our users the ability to share their Dropbox videos and images in Messenger threads with just a few taps will help them bring more style and personality to those conversations.”

Main Dropbox image via Shutterstock

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Editor John Kennedy is an award-winning technology journalist.

editorial@siliconrepublic.com