Alcatel claims 100 million DSL lines passed


10 Oct 2006

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Telecoms equipment maker Alcatel has claimed that its equipment now enables 100 million DSL lines worldwide, including installations in Ireland with Eircom.

Alcatel claims to have more than one third of the global DSL market and has doubled its total shipments since October 2004.

Alcatel installed the first ADSL system in 1996 and claims to be pioneering the DSL business with its ISAM family of triple-play IP access systems.

The ISAM technology has been selected by 16 of the top 20 DSL operators in the world.

Eircom is understood to be among the European operators to sign up for Alcatel’s ISAM triple-play technology along with Telefonica Spain and Telecom Serbia.

“Alcatel, in surpassing the 100 million DSL line shipment milestone, has set a new benchmark for DSL access vendors, a feat which is especially impressive given the increasing competitive pressures in this market,” said Eric Keith, a senior analyst with Current Analysis.

“Moreover, Alcatel’s continuing ability to retain its global DSL market leadership and set new quarterly and annual DSL port shipment records in the process is a testament to Alcatel’s corporate fortitude as well as its long-term commitment to the global broadband access market,” Keith said.

Alcatel, which makes revenues of over €13.1bn and employs 58,000 people worldwide, is currently in the process of merging with former arch rival Lucent Technologies, pending US regulatory approval.

“Customers worldwide recognise the advantage of a vendor who can integrate multiple-access components into a finished solution and offer guaranteed end-to-end service quality, especially as networks continuously increase in complexity,” said Dirk Van den Berghen, president of Alcatel’s access network activities.

By John Kennedy