Irish student comes fifth in global Microsoft comp


8 Sep 2009

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Beating the competition in all of Europe as well as coming fifth overall worldwide, Irish secondary school student Suzy Farell showed her prowess on Microsoft Office in a worldwide competition.

With more than 80,000 student competitors from 53 countries across the globe entering, the Championship Round was held in Toronto, where students sat the Microsoft Office Specialist exams in either Microsoft Word or Microsoft Excel.

"We are delighted with Suzy’s win.  She’s a great example to all Irish students, showcasing the skills they should be developing while at school which will greatly help them at third level and beyond when they enter the workplace," said Paul Rellis, managing director of Microsoft Ireland.

"In the 21st Century Smart Economy, technological skills are a necessity in the workforce and the Worldwide Competition on Microsoft Office is designed to help students develop those essential skills."

Farrell competed in the annual event through Prodigy Learning, the firm managing the Microsoft IT Academy Program on behalf of Microsoft in Ireland, who co-ordinated the Irish heats of the competition.

"Suzy is a credit to her school and represented Ireland fantastically. Students, like Suzy, who embrace IT will be the catalyst to improvements in Ireland’s economic situation over the coming years," said Kevin Ryan, marketing manager at Prodigy Learning.

The competition happens every year and is open to both Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland secondary and college students, who can carry out the exams online.

For more information on applying for next year’s competition, visit www.betheworldchamp.com.

Pictured: Student and fifth-place winner of the Worldwide Competition on Microsoft Office Suzy Farrell and Paul Rellis, managing director of Microsoft Ireland.

By Marie Boran