Science Rising is here to help us all understand STEM

16 Mar 201630 Shares

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SFI has launched the Science Rising campaign today, with the logo here made by UCD’s U3D printing hub

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SFI has launched Science Rising to help welcome more people into the STEM fold, with a more focused approach hopefully the best way to show those wary of the industry that there’s nothing to fear.

A new national campaign to promote STEM-related subjects throughout the education system has been launched by Science Foundation Ireland (SFI).

Called Science Rising, it comes on the back of a detailed report into Irish perceptions and knowledge of science, engineering, maths and technology. A total of 12 “world-leading” SFI Research Centres will support the programme, along with funded education and public engagement projects across Ireland.

At its core, Science Rising is being set up to help increase awareness of the role STEM subjects play in our everyday life, as well as in our economic future.

For example, the gap between the attitude towards computer programming at a young age and the shortage in the labour pool in Ireland is something that must be addressed.

Niamh Lyons, SFI’s interim director of communications

Niamh Lyons, SFI’s interim director of communications

Last year, an SFI report found the overwhelming majority of us think ‘a consistent supply of STEM graduates is critical to Ireland’s economic prosperity’, with governmental investment in the area a popular policy.

However, despite over half of Irish people being interested in STEM, 70pc believe it’s too specialised an area to grasp. Considering the broadness of an acronym like STEM, that’s incredible.

SFI realises its role is to change this, with its interim director, Niamh Lyons, saying her organisation needs to “break down the barriers” so that more people participate. This will help all Irish citizens to “visualise their place in Ireland today.”

new site has been set up to help with all of this, too.

Gordon Hunt is senior communications and context executive at NDRC. He previously worked as a journalist with Silicon Republic.

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