UN partnership targets worldwide IoT security standards

14 Oct 201518 Shares

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A new partnership has been established to help with education and training around the security concerns that arise from internet of things (IoT) adoption around the world.

Cryptosoft has joined with the UN’s International Telecommunications Union (ITU) to bring its security to governments and companies around the world, with the likes of a cybersecurity readiness survey already in the works.

Other projects include the creation of cryptography-focused training labs for national cyber-defence teams in developing countries.

“All industries — from energy to banking to retail — are being impacted by IoT,” said Ryan Johnson, founder of Neo Globe Consulting, which is facilitating the partnership.

“Privacy and security are major concerns, which is why partnerships like ITU and Cryptosoft are so critical.”

Internet of things – a security nightmare

We recently looked at the security concerns facing manufacturers, service providers and, more importantly, consumers as IoT takes hold of our everyday life.

People have already hacked into autonomous vehicles, cracked networks and worked out ways to bypass even the strictest of security protocols.

“It is not outside the realm of possibility,” said Justin Harvey, CSO of Fidelis Cybersecurity, “that there will be an exploit for an IoT device that could be considered ‘kinetically destructive’.”

By this, he means overheating a device, which could lead to terrible, tangible consequences.

Cryptosoft will particularly do work with ITU-S, the organisation that sets telecom standards, and ITU-D, to help find ways to use IT for social, economic and human development.

“With the influx of internet-connected devices impacting our daily lives, it’s crucial that security standards are put into practice,” said Al Sisto, the chairman at Cryptosoft.

“Users should feel at ease that their personal data is safe, no matter where in the world they live.”

Main image via Shutterstock

Gordon Hunt is a journalist at Siliconrepublic.com

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