Google: Microsoft using deal to ‘extort profit’ from Samsung


29 Sep 2011

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Google has hit out against Microsoft’s recent patent deal, which sees Samsung pay royalties to Microsoft for every Android device sold.

The deal will also see Microsoft and Samsung cross licence their patent portfolios for greater coverage and will also let them collaborate further with the development of Windows Phone.

Microsoft claimed these licensing agreements can help reduce the vast number of patent disputes among smartphone creators.

However, Google disagrees, claiming the deal aims to “extort profit from others’ achievements.”

“This is the same tactic we’ve seen time and again from Microsoft,” said a Google spokesperson.

“Failing to succeed in the smartphone market, they are resorting to legal measures to extort profit from others’ achievements and hinder the pace of innovation.

“We remain focused on building new technology and supporting Android partners,” the spokesperson said.

Google and Microsoft were previously involved in a public argument over patents and their effect on smartphone innovation.

Google’s senior vice-president and chief legal officer David Drummond claimed Microsoft, Apple and Oracle were involved in a campaign to strangle Android’s growth by buying Novell’s and Nortel’s patents, suing Android manufacturers for patent infringement and charging licensing fees for each Android device.

Microsoft hit back, claiming Google was also invited to buy Novell’s patents but refused. However, Drummond said Google didn’t join them because it believed that, by entering the agreement, protection for Android’s patents would have been eliminated.

There has also been several lawsuits over smartphone patents, which include Apple vs Samsung and Microsoft vs Motorola.