Ginger software could put English translators out of business (video)

7 Nov 2014

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Adam Ehrlich, director of marketing communications at Ginger

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Adam Ehrlich, director of marketing communications at Ginger, was at this year’s Web Summit in Dublin to showcase its software, which helps both native and non-native English speakers write better English.

The Israeli company has been developing its proofreading and correction software for seven years now and if it reaches the ambitions it has set for the years to come, could make a number of translators and English teachers considerably nervous for their future job security.

While the software is available on desktop computers, it could be argued that its wider market lies in its users’ hands, as its mobile app, Ginger Page, has been correcting Android keyboards and people’s messages for some time now.

However, with Apple recently opening up its keyboard developer tools for the first time last month, Ginger’s new iOS app hopes to open up a new market and opportunities.

In fact, the technology that has gone into Ginger Page recently made headlines after Intel singed a deal with Ginger to purchase some of the components of its correction software, and even hiring its staff, for US$30m, which could pave the way for Intel’s own virtual assistant-like algorithm.

The Web Summit 2014 : Interview with Adam Ehrlich of Ginger

Colm Gorey is a journalist with Siliconrepublic.com

editorial@siliconrepublic.com