€600,000 available for international trade training


4 Mar 2008

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Almost €600,000 will be spent on the International Trade Skillnet during 2008 and 2009, it has emerged, with funding available for training on areas such as the single window environment.

The training programme for 2008 was launched today. Member companies of the International Trade Skillnet provide €150,000 for the training, with the balance of €450,000 provided by the State’s Training Networks Programme.

The initiative will run from March to December and aims to sensitise Irish companies to the implications of regulatory changes in the area of international trade.

The skillnet recognises the economic need at government and industry level to increase exports. As a member of the skillnet, companies will receive subsidised training of up to 90pc on areas such as single window environment, authorised economic operators and new harmonised tariff codes.

“Import and export procedures are becoming increasingly complex for businesses. Since January 2008, new trade facilitation processes have been rolled out in the EU to mirror similar developments already underway in the US. Frequent and extensive regulatory changes like these present significant challenges to the approximate 15,000 Irish companies currently engaged in international trade,” said Mary Mooney, manager, International Trade Skillnet Network.

“The aim of this network is to get to the very core of sustained competitiveness in international trade, specifically the need for continual staff training,” commented Paul Stack, representative of the International Trade Skillnet steering committee. “It will help companies prepare for new developments in international trade, while providing a return on the investment – improved competitiveness for the enterprise, greater job satisfaction for employees, and, crucially, the ability to adapt to the rapidly changing landscape of international trade.”

By Niall Byrne