Dell makes a play for
gaming market


10 Aug 2005

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Computer giant Dell has made an interesting play for the hearts and pockets of PC gamers with the introduction of its new XPS 600, which packs a considerable punch as a result of a deal with graphics card giant Nvidia as well as Intel dual-core processors.

“Dell worked aggressively with Nvidia and the leading game developers to bring dual-graphics innovation quickly to customers,” said Emily Campbell, director of consumer products, Dell EMEA. “The innovation behind the XPS 600 gives gamers and enthusiasts bleeding-edge performance and entertainment value, along with the support services to keep their systems staying up all night right along with them.”

To put things in perspective, the new XPS 600 – the first Dell consumer desktop to offer dual graphics – can deliver up to 150pc faster graphics performance compared to the previous Dell XPS1.

The XPS 600 provides two PCI-Express x16 slots optimised for users who want to use dual graphics cards in a single system. Dual graphics cards and dual-core processors can significantly improve performance for gaming and multimedia applications. The machine is expected to sell at a starting price of €1,999.

Dell’s use of dual x16 PCIe graphics with Nvidia scalable link interface technology can increase video bandwidth by up to 100pc compared to competitive dual x8 PCIe-based systems. As a result, XPS 600 users can play 3-D games and DVDs at the highest resolution settings for realistic entertainment, and can easily run any future applications and devices requiring high video bandwidth.

“Dell and Nvidia are enabling customers to play all of today’s popular games or movies at the most intense and vivid settings – the way they’re meant to be played – while offering the system performance necessary to run future games and multimedia applications,” explained Jen-Hsun Huang, president and CEO of Nvidia.

By John Kennedy