HTC and Ericsson launch tailored VR and IoT accelerators

27 Apr 201642 Shares

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Tech companies HTC and Ericsson are targeting virtual reality (VR) and the internet of things (IoT), respectively, with their own dedicated accelerators kicking off.

HTC’s $100m investment in a global VR accelerator makes sense, as the former smartphone giant looks to further monetise its Vive project. With HTC calling on anyone “as passionate about VR” as it is, Vive X will start out in three cities (Beijing, Taipei and San Fransisco), before a gradual rollout worldwide.

The start-ups that get involved will be hosted in one of those cities, with access to funding and a bit of industry know-how. It’s a sensible approach to the company’s attempts to expand its VR community – one which is very small at the moment. The more ideas brought together, the better chance of creating a product with truly global appeal.

HTC Vive

“Virtual reality is changing the world, yet to do that effectively it needs a healthy ecosystem to expand into the mass market,” said Cher Wang, chair and CEO of HTC. “Through HTC Vive, we look forward to enabling global talent to create interesting and compelling content and to help shape the future of this industry.”

Ericsson has its own accelerator ideas

Meanwhile, Ericsson is doing something similar with its IoT-focused accelerator programme, uninspiringly titled IoT Accelerator. It offers start-ups the chance to bypass barriers like costs and complexities behind the development and deployment of new IoT ideas.

IoT platforms’ capabilities will include data management, billing, device management, connectivity services and analytics. Planned expansion modules such as a self-service portal, developer environment and software development kit will also be included.

“We will initially focus on public safety, utilities, transport and smart cities customers, continuously adjusting to their needs and feedback, and improving ease of use and delivery speed through a DevOps approach to software development,” said Ericsson’s Orvar Hurtig.

Dragster image via Brad Makovec/Shutterstock

Gordon Hunt is a journalist at Siliconrepublic.com

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