Irish tech firm Lincor reveals an Android-based TV system for hospitals

25 Aug 2014

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Med-tech player Lincor has rolled out a new digital TV system for hospitals based on Google’s Android operating system.

The system channels education, entertainment and clinical content directly to hospital beds via standard high-definition TV sets.

Lincor, which was established in 2003, last year raised US$9.5m (€7.3m) in investment from US venture capital firm Edison Ventures.

The Android-based system called MediaLINC delivers services such as hospital information, meal ordering and patient surveys alongside access to TV, the internet, radio, video on demand, audio books, any Android application configured for TV and a music library.

MediaLINC also supports a range of billing solutions that allow an organisation to easily package and price bundles of content should they wish to use it to raise revenue. MediaLINC is also fully localised into a number of languages.

The technology is based on the same proven LINC technology already used in more than 130 hospitals around the world.

Patient engagement

“Lincor has already been phenomenally successful in defining point of care patient engagement to bedside smart devices,” said Dan Byrne, chairman and CEO, Lincor Solutions.

“With MediaLINC we have taken that knowledge and insight to deliver patient engagement to standard hospital TVs.”

“Many hospitals have already invested in TVs for patient rooms and MediaLINC offers them a way to protect that investment while providing the latest in patient engagement services,” Byrne added. 

“We are already seeing an overwhelming interest in this product from Europe and North America. Using TVs to deliver these services helps normalise the hospital experience for patients as it is a familiar and easy to use device. It also allows hospitals to deliver services to public areas and to places with space limitations,” Byrne said.

Medical TV image via Shutterstock

Editor John Kennedy is an award-winning technology journalist.

editorial@siliconrepublic.com