Samsung’s new eye-tracking mouse allows users to blink instead of click

26 Nov 20141 Share

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An EyeCan+ demonstration. Photo via global.samsungtomorrow.com

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Consumer tech giant Samsung Electronics has unveiled its new eye-tracking mouse the EyeCan+, a device that allows people with disabilities to use computers through eye movements.

With the appliance, users can move a mouse cursor with their eyes and click by blinking or staring at a specific link. Although similar technology has been developed before (including Samsung’s own first-generation version of the device), the EyeCan+ is unique as it doesn’t require any wearable hardware, such as glasses, to work.

After being calibrated to the user’s individual eye characteristics, the EyeCan+ can be used from a distance of 60cm to 70cm from the monitor. An interface appears as a pop-up menu that includes 18 different commands, such as copy, paste, drag and drop, scroll and zoom in. Additional custom commands can also be created.

“EyeCan+ is the result of a voluntary project initiated by our engineers, and reflects their passion and commitment to engage more people in our community,” said SiJeong Cho, vice-president of community relations at Samsung Electronics in a blog post.

The device was also recently featured on South Korean public service agency Arirang TV, with Goh Byung-wook from Samsung’s community relations department saying the company had developed the device “in hopes that people with disabilities can easily communicate with the world”.

According to the project’s official website, the developers’ desire is that the product will improve the quality of life for those suffering from Lou Gehrig’s disease (ALS) and Lock in syndrome (LIS).

“We really enjoyed making the EyeCan, and since this is an open-source platform, we hope that more and more people will jump in to improve the device,” wrote the team, who have been working on the project since 2012.

Photos via global.samsungtomorrow.com

Dean is a freelance journalist and editor covering media.

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