Irish Broadband to promote wireless with €1m ad spend


29 Sep 2005

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Irish Broadband plans to spend €1m on a major marketing campaign across TV, press, radio and the web to publicise a new promotional offer for its wireless internet access service.

The campaign is scheduled to run until the end of the year and Irish Broadband claimed that during that time, it will have been seen by more than 90pc of available audiences in that time. Its first TV commercial is due to air next Monday 3 October.

The campaign was produced by Leo Burnett Associates and it marks Irish Broadband’s first significant marketing investment since it secured more than €30m in two funding rounds earlier this year.

Every advert will use the slogan ‘Some things don’t work without lines, but our broadband does…’. The purpose of the campaign is to publicise plug-and-play wireless broadband over traditional internet access services that rely on phone lines. It will also highlight the pricing model that involves no line-rental charges, no connection fee and no minimum contract. Ordinarily there is a €99 connection charge but Irish Broadband will waive this for any customers who sign up before 30 December.

The plug-and-play service, called Ripwave. is priced at €18.95 incl Vat per month. The service is currently available to customers in the cities of Dublin, Cork, Limerick, Waterford, Galway, Bray, Drogheda and Dundalk. The wireless modem for accessing the service works straight out of the box, plugged into the user’s PC or laptop. The modem offers wireless speeds of 512Kbps download and 128Kbps upload.

“Because the plug-and-play service comes straight off the shelf, no phone lines are needed to use the service, thereby saving users hundreds of euro annually on usual line rental charges associated with DSL,” said Orla Duffy, head of marketing with Irish Broadband.

By Gordon Smith