Ashley Madison hackers dump 20Gb of internal ALM data on dark web

21 Aug 201511 Shares

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Ashley Madison's hackers have now dumped a further 20GB of internal company data belonging to Avid Life Media (ALM) on the dark web.

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Just days after dumping 10Gb of data relating to users of cheating website Ashley Madison on Tor, the Impact Team hackers have now dumped a further 20Gb of internal company data belonging to Avid Life Media (ALM) on the dark web.

“Hey Noel, you can admit that it’s real now,” the hackers taunted, in reference to ALM CEO Noel Biderman’s attempts to suggest the data wasn’t genuine.

Along with the message was a 20Gb archive that is understood to contain Biderman’s emails and more of the company’s internal data.

‘If there was any questions to the validity of the data before – those should be removed now’
– DAVE KENNEDY

“The dump appears to contain all of the CEO – Noel’s — business/corporate emails, source code for all of their websites, mobile applications, and more,” said Dave Kennedy from TrustedSec.

Kennedy went on: “Interesting enough, if this turns out to be legitimate, which it in all aspects appears to be, having full source code to these websites means that other hacker groups now have the ability to find new flaws in Avid Life’s websites, and further compromise them more.

“If there was any questions to the validity of the data before – those should be removed now.”

Repercussions for 33m users of Ashley Madison

Security researchers and media in recent days confirmed that usernames, passwords, credit card details and street addresses included in the original data dump belonging to 33m users were authentic.

The repercussions for these 33m users could be wide-ranging, leading to possible evidence in divorce cases, hurt for spouses, embarrassment personally and professionally and in some cases may cost individuals their careers.

It includes 115,000 Irish users of the site, with Ireland ranked 10th per capita globally on the list of worldwide members seeking opportunities to cheat, The Irish Times previously reported.

There are also some 15,000 accounts related to members of the US military.

Hacker image via Shutterstock

Editor John Kennedy is an award-winning technology journalist.

editorial@siliconrepublic.com