HP taking over from Apple as driver of innovation, claims HP

4 Apr 201610 Shares

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With a new laptop to be released this week, HP is making bold claims about its position in the tech landscape. Watch out Apple, it seems to be saying.

Apple’s business model of almost exclusively premium end, sleek, innovative devices has turned it into the one of the most profitable companies in the world. But now HP thinks it’s taking over.

With iTunes, the iPhone, the iPod and most recent Macs, Apple has found form in producing incredibly popular devices. Fans think they look cool, they feel right and add in tangible Apple stores and you have an entire ecosystem with its own inclusive feel.

However, maybe that’s all about to change, with HP soon to launch a new laptop that will be in direct competition with MacBook at the top end of the market.

“For years, Apple has been seen as the innovator and the driver of innovation,” said Ron Coughlin, president of HP’s personal systems group, to the Wall Street Journal ahead of tomorrow’s release. “HP is really taking over that mantle.”

That might sound a bit optimistic, but HP has been doing some really clever things in the past year or so.

Last year, among its Windows releases, HP’s curved Envy desktop PC – billed as the “world’s widest curved all-in-one PC” – stands out, for example.

Earlier this year it released an EliteBook Folio, which has been described as a MacBook that runs Windows – and it’s actually thinner than Apple’s showpiece product.

Tomorrow we’ll know what Coughlin is talking about, with another thin, premium laptop expected to be shown off at the International Luxury Conference in Versailles.

Main HP image via Anton Watman/Shutterstock

Gordon Hunt is senior communications and context executive at NDRC. He previously worked as a journalist with Silicon Republic.

editorial@siliconrepublic.com