Sigma Wireless creates 70 new R&D jobs


23 Sep 2003

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on RedditEmail this to someone

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on RedditEmail this to someone

Irish wireless firm Sigma Wireless has said that it will create 70 new jobs in Finglas in the area of research and development of third generation (3G) mobile antennae.

The new 3G antennae, the company said, will make Ireland a world leader in the new technology. The company said that it has already signed an agreement to deploy the new technology with O2, a move that will see customers of O2 in Ireland becoming the first in the world to benefit from the new technology.

The new 3G antennae are the product of a €6m R&D programme established in recent years by the company.

According to Sigma, the new technology can be deployed on existing 2G and 2.5G networks, which will allow companies to benchmark their existing technology investments.

The technology can also be deployed on Tetra networks, which are secure encrypted networks used by security and emergency services worldwide. Recently Sigma scored a major €1.3m deal to rollout a Tetra network in conjunction with mobile giant Motorola for the emergency communications system of the new Luas light rail network for Dublin.

“The future for manufacturing in Ireland has to be based around indigenous companies with deep R&D roots combined with high value manufacturing,” said Sigma Wireless Group’s CEO Tony Boyle. “This contract [with O2] is hopefully the first of many and indicates that it is possible to achieve global leadership and secure valuable telecom markets for Ireland.”

Established in 1979, Sigma has built up a strong tradition of experience and expertise in the delivery of wireless communications systems to the Government, semi-State sector and industry. The company has offices in Dublin, Cork and Belfast and Aylesbury in the UK and employs almost 400 people.

By John Kennedy