Dunphy blog in prospect?


24 Apr 2007

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Controversial broadcaster Eamon Dunphy has said he would be interested in starting a weblog that would allow people to read and comment on his opinions, siliconrepublic.com can reveal.

Given Dunphy’s ability to provoke debate among football fans and the wider public, a regularly updated blog would surely generate heavy traffic to check out what he has to say. “I’d like to,” he told siliconrepublic.com. “My internet semi-literacy is a small problem,” he joked.

For all that, Dunphy’s conquest of new media continues apace. His RTE radio show Conversations with Eamon Dunphy is among the top-rated Irish podcasts. He also presents a made-for-mobile TV show which is available on 3’s network.

The 15-minute show, Dunphy’s Last Word on Football, is available every Monday as a video stream on 3 and there is also a two-minute programme every Friday, previewing the weekend’s action. Dunphy records the show at his home in Dublin and says he enjoys the “immediacy” of a made-for-mobile show, with a format that is less restricted than TV punditry.

He’s clearly aware of the interactive possibilities new media like mobile and blogs offer. Random Thoughts, the production company that provides the show to 3, confirmed that a feedback forum where mobile viewers could send in videos of themselves is in development.

“We’re hoping to get an interactive thing going with the audience. It would be better, we could have a two-way thing,” said Dunphy. “I think that would be great because it would be a community of people having a discussion rather than a monologue.”

The man himself was in typically bullish form yesterday morning after the shooting of his latest mobile episode, saying he preferred to be wrong rather than sit on the fence like other pundits and analysts. “I was wrong about Platini but I was right about a lot of things.”

By Gordon Smith