Amazon to overhaul Whole Foods as merger draws to a close

25 Aug 20173 Shares

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Whole Foods Market store in Austin, Texas. Image: Philip Arno Photography/Shutterstock

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The Amazon merger with Whole Foods promises, among other things, cheaper avocados.

In a press release detailing the imminent closing of its $13.7bn acquisition of Whole Foods Market, Amazon has outlined numerous changes that are set to transform grocery shopping.

The merger itself will close next Monday (August 28), with lower prices coming into effect on a selection of the company’s best-selling products, such as bananas, eggs, baby kale and, of course, the ubiquitous avocado.

‘There is significant work and opportunity ahead, and we’re thrilled to get started’
– JEFF WILKE

“It’s been our mission for 39 years at Whole Foods Market to bring the highest quality food to our customers,” said John Mackey, co-founder and CEO of Whole Foods.

“By working together with Amazon and integrating in several key areas, we can lower prices and double down on that mission and reach more people with Whole Foods Market’s high-quality, natural and organic food.

“As part of our commitment to quality, we’ll continue to expand our efforts to support and promote local products and suppliers.”

Amazon emphasises integration

These price drops were widely expected, but there are some other intriguing changes in the pipeline for the premium supermarket brand.

Integration is a major aspect, with Amazon Prime eventually set to become the official customer rewards scheme for Whole Foods patrons.

Cross-platform selling is also on the cards, with Whole Foods private-label products to be made available on Amazon.com.

Meanwhile, Amazon Lockers will be integrated into selected Whole Foods Market stores, meaning customers can have products shipped from Amazon.com to their local grocery branch, or send Amazon returns back as they do their weekly shop.

This merger looks set to create a more seamless shopping experience, and will definitely make an impact on how other grocery chains run their businesses as the industry transforms.

“There is significant work and opportunity ahead, and we’re thrilled to get started,” said Jeff Wilke, CEO of Worldwide Consumer at Amazon, describing the company as “determined to make healthy and organic food affordable for everyone”.

Whole Foods Market store in Austin, Texas. Image: Philip Arno Photography/Shutterstock

Ellen Tannam is a writer covering all manner of business and tech subjects

editorial@siliconrepublic.com