10,000 clean-tech jobs expected in the next five years


23 Nov 2010

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Ireland’s first green economic zone known as An tSlí Ghlas – The Green Way, has forecast 10,000 jobs over the next five years in the green sector.

An tSlí Ghlas – The Green Way, a triple helix of industry, academic institutions and local authorities  - Ballymun Regeneration, Dublin Airport Authority, Dublin City University, Dublin Institute of Technology, Fingal County Council, Dublin City Council and North Dublin Chamber – was launched yesterday by European Commissioner for Research, Innovation and Science Maire Geoghegan-Quinn, and aims to position Ireland as a centre of clean-tech innovation and enterprise.

Tony Boyle, chairman of Steering Committee for An tSlí Ghlas – The Green Way said that by creating an internationally recognised green economic zone, it could position Ireland as a leader in the world’s fastest-growing sector.

Assets and infrastructure

“The potential of this project, which builds on our existing assets and infrastructure, is that it can assist in the transformation of our economy.

“By building the linkage between universities and industry we can create products that can not only be sold here but on a scalable global basis – creating an economic zone and competitive advantage in North Dublin,” said Boyle.

“The overall potential of the Green Way, which builds on our existing assets and infrastructure, is that it can assist in the transformation of our economy.

“It will, and has already started to, create jobs in the clean-tech sector, which is the largest job and wealth creation opportunity of the 21st century,” he added.

What is it?

An tSlí Ghlas-The Green Way, is a green economic corridor stretching from Dublin’s city centre along a north-city spine via the new town of Ballymun to Dublin Airport, and potentially further afield. The corridor will link a series of key green-tech and clean-tech innovative enterprises which will promote exemplary sustainable best practice through a global network in building, transport, energy provision, water and waste management – as well as personal environmental responsibility.

Linking business with investors

An tSlí Ghlas-The Green Way’s overall goal is to link business to investors and develop trade partnerships with other major international green corridors, such as US East Bay Green Corridor and Lahti Clean-Tech Science Park, Finland.

Boyle also said An tSlí Ghlas – The Green Way – which provides mentoring programmes for start-ups and clean-tech entrepreneurs –  will help businesses adapt greener, more innovative practices in business and can save massive amounts of money on energy.

"We’ve heard a lot of complaints about high costs of energy in Ireland. Driving energy costs is a huge issue. Sometimes a recession makes people more conscious of their costs. A number of carbon funds are emerging. Most business can save significant amounts of money by using their energy better. There are lots of payoffs for businesses, giving you a better performance."

Recruitment is under way for a CEO and operations director for An tSlí Ghlas – The Green Way and appointments are expected to be made by January 2011.

The aim of An tSlí Ghlas-The Green Way, is to position Ireland as a centre of clean-tech innovation and enterprise which will link business to investors and develop trade partnerships with other major international green corridors.

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