Windows 7 debuts next month for developers


26 Sep 2008

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Seinfeld or no Seinfeld, Windows Vista was always going to be a hard sell for Microsoft. Most business users were content with XP and experienced driver support issues with Vista in the beginning. Much of the talk surrounding this operating system (OS) was: when will Microsoft release its successor?

This 28 October 2008, the pre-beta version of Windows 7 will be unveiled at the Professional Developers Conference (PDC) for developers to road test before it comes to market, which is expected to be as late as 2010.

Over 20 sessions on the OS will be held, with topics including how to develop applications for Microsoft Surface – the interactive tabletop touchscreen technology, which was launched on 17 April 2008.

The reason this will be included is because the new Windows 7 OS will have many multi-touch elements incorporated, as well as a pared-down approach where previously available pre-installed software will now be available ‘in the cloud’ through the Windows Live portal.

On his official blog, Microsoft evangelist Mike Swanson said: “If you were wondering how much you’d hear about Windows 7 at this year’s Professional Developers Conference, you now have the answer: a lot.”

“You’ll be able to install your own copy of Windows 7 and play with it on your hardware. This is a very limited release, and PDC2008 attendees will be the first to get it.”

So while developers play with, code for and give feedback on the latest Windows OS, we already know that it will not be as ‘bulky’ as its predecessor and will follow on in the latest computer trends of touch interface with one- and two-finger gesturing input.

Also, it will take advantage of cloud computing for applications, which will be a driving factor to Windows 7 transferring well onto the new generation of netbooks currently running on XP.

By Marie Boran

Pictured: an early build of Windows 7