Top 10 churches for WiFi – an infographic you didn’t expect

9 Oct 201522 Shares

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The first time we check into a hotel, go to a bar or sit in a restaurant, invariably we consider how soon to ask for the WiFi code. Why should it be any different for churches?

Presumably there is an answer to that, but let’s disregard any concerns and push straight on with the topic.

Internet watchdog Rotten WiFi has taken on the surprising task of rating churches all across the globe for their WiFi capabilities, with the US, UK, Romania, Canada, Hungary and Mexico each featuring on the top ten.

It’s a (mildly) understandable pursuit, actually. Churches are places people go to for, say, a one-hour mass.

Now, I can’t name too many people who go that length of time without checking their phone. I can’t think of many people who would go that long without some form of notification encouraging them to drop everything and log in.

Rotten WiFi suggests that, as people happily surf the web elsewhere, what’s to stop them in places of worship? “Who knows, maybe for someone having WiFi in church is the best way to be always connected to God.”

The fastest average download speed of 57.68 Mbps was recorded in the UK at St Cuthbert’s Church, almost double that of any other ranked location.

On the whole, the slowest WiFi speed was measured in the Philippines in St Peter & Paul Cathedral (0.03Mbps). Included on the below list are three US locations: Sulphur First Baptist Church in Louisiana, Horizon Christian Fellowship in California and Church of the Redeemer in Maryland.*

Here’s an interactive infographic to show you all you didn’t think you needed to know about church WiFi.

*Updated at 9 October at 9.20am to note that Sulphur is a location in Louisiana.

Gigglebit is Siliconrepublic.com’s daily dose of the funny and fantastic in science and tech, to help start your day on a lighter note.

Main image via Shutterstock

Gordon Hunt is senior communications and context executive at NDRC. He previously worked as a journalist with Silicon Republic.

editorial@siliconrepublic.com