Selfies, delfies and everything elsies (infographic)

24 May 201622 Shares

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Photography has flipped a full 180-degrees since smartphones came along.

The selfie syndrome is strong, remarkably so. If you scroll through someone’s image bank on whatever social media platform they prefer, you’ll generally be greeted with various backgrounds supporting the same, smiling face.

It’s a bit like Fr Dougal McGuire’s holiday photographs in Father Ted: Life imitating art.

Fr Dougal McGuire selfie

Smartphones aren’t the sole reason behind the growth in popularity of selfies. Social media platforms are now built for these activities. From Twitter and Instagram to Snapchat and Facebook, every website or app is familiar with the culture of the selfie.

Tagging, commenting and liking these photos is simple and encouraged, adding currency to the posts (in the minds of the posters, presumably).

Selfie

Selfie and beyond

However, modern technology doesn’t stand still, so why should consumers? Now there are Instagram accounts for ‘famous’ pets. People get selfies with the man taking them hostage.

Payment companies are even working out ways to let consumers make transactions with selfies. Amazon filed a patent to allow shoppers to confirm purchases by taking a photo or video of themselves earlier this year, with MasterCard planning something similar, too.

So how about an exhaustive list (via Mybreast.org) of the various derivatives of selfies there are, with felfies, wealthies and alcohol-induced drelfies to beat the band.

Evolution of the selfie

Main selfie image via Shutterstock

Gordon Hunt is senior communications and context executive at NDRC. He previously worked as a journalist with Silicon Republic.

editorial@siliconrepublic.com