Harry’s back and he’s all fired up with ‘PizzaBot: Reheated’

11 Jan 201780 Shares

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Cork teen coder Harry Moran. Image: Connor McKenna

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Cork teen coder Harry Moran has released a new app in the App Store and on Google Play called ‘Reheated’, the latest in the PizzaBot saga.

Moran gained fame in 2011 when as a 12-year-old, he became the then youngest software developer to release an app on the Mac App Store, called PizzaBot.

He learned how to code as one of the earliest members of CoderDojo in Cork.

‘The game is customisable and allows players to add new capabilities using different toppings’
– HARRY MORAN

He followed this up with a mobile sequel called PizzaBot Seasonings and at 14, he launched a new title called Robot Run.

Now 18 years old, Moran, a 5th year student at Coláiste an Spioraid Naoimh in Cork, has his sights set on a career in software.

He spent the last summer in London as an intern with Unit9, working on a project with record producer Deadmau5 and Absolut Vodka.

During his transition year, he also crammed in work experience at Intel in Leixlip, and started a robotics club in his school that has gone on to compete in the Vex Robotics competition, where the team came third in Ireland.

Harry ups his game

Harry’s back and he’s all fired up with ‘PizzaBot: Reheated’

18-year-old Cork coder Harry Moran. Image: Connor McKenna

The new game PizzaBot: Reheated was released today on iOS in the App Store and on Android on the Google Play store.

It also features as his entry this year in the BT Young Science and Technology Exhibition, where he is showcasing the game as an example of randomly generated algorithms.

“The game is customisable and allows players to add new capabilities using different toppings,” Moran said. “Also, the randomly generated algorithms throw infinite possibilities as new waves attack.”

The game is certainly a more polished affair than earlier versions, representing Moran’s growing prowess at coding, with brasher graphics and sound effects.

He started development of the latest game when he was 16.

“There is definitely a lot more mathematical science in this one,” Moran said.

Looking ahead to his Leaving Cert year, Moran said he plans to study computing at third level, but said the jury is out on whether he plans to study in Ireland or overseas.

“The hardest decision will be whether I will study computer science or computer engineering,” Moran added.

Editor John Kennedy is an award-winning technology journalist.

editorial@siliconrepublic.com