Watch the moon landing in real-time on website

4 Apr 20168 Shares

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Have you ever longingly looked at footage of the 1969 Apollo 11 moon landing and wished you were there to witness it in real-time? Well, now you (sort of) can with the help of a brilliant website.

I’ll begin by saying that this journalist definitely falls into the camp that’s wishing, at least for one day, to return to 1969 to see one of the greatest achievements humankind has managed to-date, at least in terms of exploration in space.

Yet, if you look it up online today, you are either watching one of the many documentaries filmed about the landing that occurred nearly half a century ago or you’re wading through the myriad moon landing conspiracy videos posted to YouTube.

Therefore, it was quite a pleasant surprise to stumble across a website that has painstakingly rearranged all of the original Apollo 11 space-flight video footage, communication audio, mission control room conversations, text transcripts and telemetry data, and synchronised it into an integrated audio-visual experience.

The project was the result of hours upon hours of work by Thamtech, a web and software development business.

Explaining its reasons behind creating such a resource, Thamtech said: “Our goal is to capture a moment in history so that generations may now relive the events with this interactive educational resource.”

Each section of the page will offer a different piece of information with transcribed conversations running down either side of the page.

Click on the image below to get started!

Go button

Buzz Aldrin in front of the Apollo 11 Lunar Module. Image via Marc van Norden/Flickr

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Colm Gorey is a journalist with Siliconrepublic.com

editorial@siliconrepublic.com