NDRC launches new early-stage investment programme Catalyser

27 Oct 201563 Shares

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NDRC is situated just down the road from Christ Church in Dublin

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The NDRC has announced a new early-stage investor programme called Catalyser, with €100,000 on offer for successful start-ups with “deep industry or research based knowledge and technology”.

The Catalyser programme is not sector specific, but NDRC is particularly interested in academic researchers with early-stage ­concepts – the plan then is to turn the concept into a commercial business within the six-month timeframe, beginning in January.

The breakdown of the €100,000 is an initial €30,000 in equity and the remainder goal-based.

Applicants for the programme will be required to pitch their ideas to a panel next month, with a one-day workshop then establishing the timeline goals required to gain funding.

“We’re targeting those founders who may be currently working in research, or indeed in industry, and who have seen a real business need that they have the insight, skills and technology to meet,” said Ben Hurley, CEO of NDRC.

In total, it should take no more than four weeks for successful parties to get from application to acceptance, with an open night on 9 November for those interested.

“It can be either product or service led so long as it has the ability to scale internationally by addressing a global market opportunity,” said Hurley.

“As with all NDRC investments, the venture must be capable of generating interest from investors and/or creating viable revenue streams within six to nine months.”

NDRC Catalyser investments will close in 2015, and the residential programme is planned to commence in January 2016.

Main image via Shutterstock

Gordon Hunt is senior communications and context executive at NDRC. He previously worked as a journalist with Silicon Republic.

editorial@siliconrepublic.com